Mikey Dread – Friend & Money (1978)

Posted in Dennis Brown, Joe Gibbs, Mikey Dread, Studio One with tags , , , on May 15, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Although he did record quite a few tracks in the Joe Gibbs studio, Michael Campbell, (1952 – 2008) better known as Mikey Dread, did not release much of his tracks through any of Joe’s imprints. ‘Friend and money’ is the only one I’m aware of, actually. The song was released on 7″ in 1978 on the Errol T label, riding an update of the ‘Money in my pocket’ riddim which is, well to me personally anyway, more interesting than the toast itself. Although not half bad – it is actually pretty good in its own right – ‘Friend and Money’ suffers a bit from the stiff competition put up by other epic Mikey Dread tracks out there. It’s a great catch as a supplement to your existing collection, but it won’t stand out as the best track in there. That said, this Mikey Dread track is still highly enjoyable for its lyrics, the familiar nasal sound of Mikeys voice and the great riddim update that The Professionals laid down for this take. This track was also released on the ‘Original DJ Classics Vol 2 sampler (lp), that was released on the Rocky One imprint in the 1990’s. Being an avid funk fan as much as I am a reggae fan, I can not deny the influence one scene has on another, and on this 7″ right here, things merge beautifuly and splendidly. A sound commonly heard in the late 70’s funk/disco era was the tweaked and flanged-out sound of the Fender Rhodes and that sound, or a hint towards it at least, can also be heard on the flip of this Mikey Dread single. ‘Bubbler in Money’ is nothing short of a pure funk anthem. One that should easily be able to satisfy fans of, for instance, Larry Youngs’ ‘Turn off the lights or the Ohio Players’ ‘Funky Worm.’ This keyboard heavy sound was recorded and utilized more often at the Gibbs studios in the late 70’s and early 80’s, many of which can be found on the ‘Majestic Dub album, which is, sadly, not as majestic as the title suggests. It’s an album worthwhile checking out for some impressive versions that add some to the more common and familiar styles and versions out there. Why they didn’t include ‘Bubbler in Money’ on there shall forever remain a mystery though. It’s the best version in that particular style they got…”
Pressure Beat (Video)
YouTube: Mikey Dread & Dennis Brown – Friend & Money

A beginner’s guide to Scientist, dub reggae’s experimental genius

Posted in Scientist with tags on May 8, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“The Jamaican audio engineer Scientist is one of the crucial links in a musically innovative chain that begins in the late 60s with King Tubby, progresses through Prince Jammy in the 70s, and falls to a close with Peter Chemist in the mid-80s. A truly outstanding practitioner who thrived on innovation, Scientist helped dub reach some of its greatest heights of creativity. He became one of Jamaica’s most sought-after engineers at a very young age, his mixing artistry rising up in tandem with the Roots Radics in the late 70s and early 80s. Because of the incredible dub works he fashioned as an apprentice engineer at King Tubby’s studio, many dub fans consider Scientist to be the last of the classical Jamaican dub mixers, yet his overall contribution to the evolution of reggae is far more multifaceted than most realise. In fact, Scientist was all over the place as the 70s gave way to the 80s, shaping significant vocal and dub works at Studio One, Channel One and Tuff Gong at a time in which reggae was undergoing dramatic changes. …”
FACT
YouTube: The Scientist mixes Ted Sirota’s Heavyweight Dub — “Stop & Frisk Dub”

Ruffy & Tuffy

Posted in Augustus Pablo, Dub, Rockers International with tags , , on May 5, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Othis ‘Tuffy Radikal’ Newton is a singer of unique caliber. His special tone and expression are used to bridge culture and roots with dancehall. This mellow singer has a history in Reggae Music Fraternity, being half of the duo Ruffy and Tuffy, twin brothers. Both were born to a Rastafari Empress in the inner city of Kingston, Jamaica. His mother named him Otis after the great soul singer Otis Redding. He started his musical journey at the age of seven, singing in Nyabinghi choir, and made his first stage appearance dancing on stage with Bob Marley, and the I-Threes at age 13. Ruffy and Tuffy gained popularity with a song dating back to 1985 called ‘Take One Step’, which was released by Rockers International Label. This was followed by an album titled ‘Climax’ which was released in Europe two years later, consisting of four songs with the version on the flip side. Sales from the album was very encouraging, especially in Europe, and this helped spark another release in 1992 called ‘Harm no One’ and ‘Danger Zone’ produced by Augustus Pablo also on Rockers International Label. …”
Reggae Discography
YouTube: Take One Step + Dub, Harm No One / Augustus Pablo Version, If The 3rd World War Is A Must, The Day After + Version, Climax + Version, Beholld & Behold Dub

Jullian / Unforgettables – The Gardener, 3rd & 4th Generation – Version

Posted in Joe Gibbs, Judy Mowatt with tags , on April 30, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“The link between the Memphis based Stax label and the Kingston studio’s has always been tight. Inhouse band Booker T and the MG’s and the label’s fine catalogue of southern soul singers were very influential on the reggae scene and, if you dig deep enough, you can find a large share of Stax’ output in a Jamaican version. The love was mutual, apparently, as Stax headhoncho Al Bell visited the island quite often to vacation and visit the studios. It’s without doubt that these visits must have made an impact on the boss, but whether or not he stole, lent or borrowed the bassline of the Harry J Allstars’ ‘Liquidator’ for his Staple Singers’ “I’ll take you there” shall forever be open to debate. The court ruled ‘no’, Al Bell played the “coincidence” card, Harry J stated that mr. Bell personally took several copies off of him and this fine article on Stax even claims divine intervention. Bickering aside, though, it seems accurate to state that both scenes mutually benefitted and influenced each other. Copyright infringement and reggae unfortunately go together like chicken and rice. You don’t have to be a serious collector to encounter a label that reads ‘adopted’, when the song is clearly a cover, or, even worse, producers themselves claiming the control. Joe Gibbs was no exception, but on this release he plays fair game. Copyright-wise that is, because the singer is hiding behind pseudonyms for legal reasons. The Gardener is both credited to Jullian and The Unforgettables.

Scoring hits with “Silent river runs deep” and “Son of a preacher man” with the girl fronted rocksteady/early-reggae outfit The Gaylettes, Judy Mowatt was asked to leave the group because she was pregnant. Singing and pregnancy didn’t combine, they believed at the time, so she embarked on a solo career. She linked up with Bunny Wailer for whom she wrote several songs, including ‘Reincarnated soul‘ (b-side to ‘Concrete Jungle’) which is credited to her alias Jean Watt, and she recorded under the Julie Anne / Julian / Jullian monniker for Sonia Pottinger, Byron Lee, Joe Gibbs and Duke Reid (for the latter she sung a version of ‘Woman of the ghetto’, which was credited to Phyllis Dillon in the UK.) Although a great songsmith in her own right, Judy regularly visits other artist’s songs on her records and the Gardener is one of them.

Judy Mowatt would join Bob Marley’s I Three’s shortly after this song was recorded, but, no, the “We Three” credit on the label is not a prophecy. The Gardener was originally recorded by the Staple Singers and featured on their “We’ll get over” album, which, incidentally, was released by Stax in 1969. The song was penned by Homer Banks, Bettye Crutcher and Raymond Jackson. Homer teamed up with his fellow writers after his career with the Soul Consolidators failed to take off. Although he’d written successful songs for others before, it was the threesome that would write the biggest hits. Sure shot knock-outs such as Johnny Taylor’s “Who’s making love” and Isaacs Hayes’ “If loving you is wrong” would eventually earn them the epithet ‘We Three’. With a production team that strong, it makes sense for Jullian to stick to their style sheet closely. Which is exactly what she did and to great effect. The Gardener is a perfect example of Memphis meeting Kingston, of southern flavor meeting yard vibes and of reciprocal inspiration. The results, on both sides, are golden.”
Pressure Beat (Video)

YouTube: The Unforgettables – The Gardener

Alton Ellis ‎– Rise And Fall / Earl Sixteen – Make Up Your Mind (1979)

Posted in Alton Ellis with tags on April 23, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Taken from the recently reissued ‘Many Moods Of Alton Ellis’ album and produced by Earl ‘Heptone’ Morgan this is roots flavoured Alton with some great Heptones harmonies on a cut to Earl 16’s ‘The World Has Just Begun’. Second side features Earl himself on a treatment of the wicked rhythm used for Junior Delgado’s ‘Don’t Study Wrong’.”
Dub Vendor
Podomatic (Video)
YouTube: Alton Ellis ‎– Rise And Fall, Earl Sixteen – Make Up Your Mind

Joe Gibbs ‎– Dub Serial (1973)

Posted in Dub, Joe Gibbs with tags , on April 21, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


Greensleeves is re-releasing the first and long lost dub set by one of our alltime favourite producers Joe Gibbs. Originally issued circa 1973 alongside other classic early dub sets including Lee Perry’s Black Board Jungle and Rhythm Shower, Herman Chin-Loy’s Aquarius Dub, Randy’s Java Dub (mixed by Errol Thompson), Prince Buster’s The Message Dubwise and others. Virtually unheard since that time, it’s a dubhead’s dream come true, with early raw drum and bass cuts to Gibbs’s cut to Satta Massagana, Love Me Girl, Money In My Pocket and the killer cut to He Prayed used by Big Youth for his Foreman Vs Frasier. Spare on the effects, just a bit of echo and reverb and a couple of vicious tape rewinds. If you dig Joe’s African Dub chapters, you’ll need this album too. Dub Serial can also be found on cd in the boxset Evolution Of Dub Vol.1, also on Greensleeves.”
Elephant Soundsystem
YouTube: Dub serial 34:45

Rub-a-Dub Style: The Roots of Modern Dancehall (2012)

Posted in Dancehall with tags on April 17, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


Rub-a-Dub Style: The Roots of Modern Dancehall is the first book to look, in- depth, at reggae in the 1980s, the period in Jamaican music that gave birth to what we know today as the ‘Dancehall’ sound. Some of the subjects that are covered include the development of sound systems in post independence Jamaica, ‘slackness’ v ‘culture’, political war and its effect on sound system activity, the ‘digital’ breakthrough in 1985, women entertainers’ struggles to make it in a male dominated field, the ‘sing-jay’ style and how deejay lyrics changed throughout the years, how dance cassettes spread the rub-a-dub style, the reggae business model and the problems it created, the fight against the dance hall style and its ultimate triumph as the premier sound of Jamaica today.”
Rub-a-Dub Style: The Roots of Modern Dancehall
Reggae Vibes
[PDF] Rub-a-Dub Style: The Roots of Modern Dancehall

Dancehall – The Rise of Jamaican Dancehall Culture released on Soul Jazz Records is an essential guide and who’s who to the phenomenal explosion of Dancehall in Jamaica in the 1980s and its subsequently rise throughout the world. Released to coincide with the launch of Beth Lesser’s deluxe 200-page book of the same name (also published by Soul Jazz Records) featuring hundreds of amazing photographs and accompanying text, this new CD double-album features a pantheon of Dancehall stars – Gregory Isaacs, Sugar Minott, Sister Nancy, Tenor Saw, Sly & Robbie, King Jammy, Eek A Mouse, Yellowman, Frankie Paul and many, many more. …”
soundsoftheuniverse: Dancehall – The Rise of Jamaican Dancehall Culture (Video)
soundsoftheuniverse: Dancehall 2 – The Rise of Jamaican Dancehall Culture (Video)
amazon: Dancehall, Dancehall 2