Life Style – Barrington Levy (1983)

Posted in Barrington Levy, Channel One with tags , on November 30, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Originally released in 1983 ‘Life Style’ is probably the most sought after and one of the best Roots Reggae albums by Barrington Levy. Born in 1964 Barrington Levy started his career at the age of 15.He became famous early with his hits produced by Henry ‘Junjo’ Lawes on the ‘Roots Radics’ Riddims. Recorded at Channel One, Arranged & Produced by Alvin ‘GG’s’ Ranglin ‘Life Style’ is reissued on vinyl for the first time.”
Sounds of the Universe
Barrington Levy
YouTube: Barrington Levy’s Life Style (1983 Full Album)

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The Heptones – Be the one + the road is rough (1972)

Posted in Joe Gibbs, The Heptones with tags , on November 12, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“I’ve already stated my sentiment elsewhere that the almighty Heptones recorded their best material right after leaving Studio One. No longer tied to a studio or a producer the gifted threesome were free to record whatever sound they were after. The result is a sublime songbook; featuring originals, cover songs and do-overs; which is worth, or mandatory I would say, checking out for everyone digging reggae, soul and funk. Despite having laid down many classic tunes, superb basslines and tight riddims over at the foundation studio, I feel the strongest Heptones material was recorded in the early seventies. Because it all just seems to come together in this era. The new studio’s in which they now recorded provided them with a crisp, more modern, edgier and fatter sound. Add to that their unique way of choosing their cover songs; the late, great Barry Llewellyn read the lyrics of the ‘Book of rules‘ somewhere and thought it would make a good song; and their baffling songwriting skills and you have a picture perfect. And just as when they were operating from Brentford Road, the Heptones continued to spawn classic tune after classic tune. ‘Be the one’ is one of those songs. Slightly overlooked, perhaps, due to the big heap of quality Heptones material out there, a first listen will issue a song that fits both in the soul, gospel and reggae corner. The traditional Heptones cookbook, if you will. ‘Be The One’, a song the Heptones first recorded for Studio One (titled ‘Show us the way‘), is an upbeat song driven by a heavy halftimed bassline and a punchy keyboard that delivers an irresistable hook. It’s the same hook that makes it a standout track, as “Be The One Version”, on the infamous Dub Serial lp. On the original 7″ that dub is called ‘The Road is rough’ which is an excerpt from the positive lyrics the Heptones’ wrote for this song. I can’t make out if the song is about young lovers, religion or politics, but I suspect all topics are at hand here. …”
Pressure Beat (Audio)
YouTube: The Heptones – Be the one + the road is rough

Jacob Miller – “Healing of the Nation” (1978)

Posted in Jacob Miller, Tommy Cowan with tags , on October 21, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Jacob Miller returns yet again to one of his favorite themes, the legalization of ganja for ‘Healing of the Nation’. This time around he addresses himself directly to the Jamaican government, with a series of respectful and well reasoned arguments. ‘You no fight against the rum-man, you no fight against the wine-man, you no fight against the cigarette smoking, yet you know, yes you know, these things give cancer.’ Instead, the Jamaican government expends vast amount of resources chasing down and jailing the colliemen, when in fact, according to Miller, collie cures cancer. There’s little, if any research, to support that claim, but still the singer has a case to make when he declares that an end to criminalization would bring about a healing of the nation. Produced by Tommy Cowan, and backed by Inner Circle and several Revolutionaries, the song features a suitably militant rhythm, the peppering of drum beats and percussion offset by the throbbing bass, and shadowed by the bright riffs and anthemic melody. Miller brings every ounce of conviction to his delivery, echoed by the musicians own sizzling performance. This fabulous single was released under Miller’s name alone in 1978, and included on his Wanted album.”
allmusic
Genius
YouTube: “Healing of the Nation”

Joe Gibbs and The Professionals – No Bones For The Dogs b/w The Mighty Two – Throw It Joe (1977)

Posted in Dennis Brown, Joe Gibbs, Treasure Isle with tags , , on October 16, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Jamaica is probably best known for their immense musical output. It never ceases to amaze me that an island so small, relatively speaking, produces so vast an amount of great music and, in the process, is able to influence the entire world with their unique and one-of-a-kind sound. But there is more to Jamaica than just the music alone, ofcourse. Its isolation has granted the island with extraordinary flora and fauna, including thousands of plants, manifold sorts of reptiles and numerous kinds of butterflies. If birdwatching is your thing, a visit to Jamaica even seems mandatory. Currently Jamaica hosts an impressive 324 species of birds, of which a whopping 160 are rare and an elite class of 28 are exclusive to the island. The Doctor Bird is one of those endemic species -the Arawaks called it the ‘God Bird’, for they believed it possessed magical powers – and is one of the national symbols of the nation. Naturally, the music scene of Jamaica took influence from their surroundings, although less than you’d expect with that rich an avifauna. The legendary engineer Graeme Goodal named his label after the humming bird, Jackie Mittoo imitated a songbird and Alton Ellis wondered ‘Why birds follow spring.‘ The latter was a big hit when it was released by Treasure Isle in 1967 and it has never stopped to grasp the attention of musicians, singers and fans alike. Even today the riddim is very popular and it can pride itself in receiving an update every few years or so. Joe Gibbs, never one to deny a good Treasure Isle riddim a new lick, also made good use of it. …”
Pressure Beat (Audio)
YouTube: No Bones For The Dogs b/w The Mighty Two – Throw It Joe

Dubcast Vol.05 (Mixed by Bent Back Sounds)

Posted in Dub with tags on October 1, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“For the fifth installment of our Dubcast series, we’ve collaborated with fellow Brooklynite and label head Bent Backs Sound. Passionate about the 80’s era of reggae, Bent Backs Sound has collected records for over 10 years before becoming a label in its own right. The first part of this dubcast pays tribute to some of the artists and labels who influenced the sound via a fine vinyl selection. The second part of the dubcast serves as a Bent Backs Records showcase, showing off some killer exclusive dubplates and leaking unreleased tracks freshly out of the dub factory.”
Brooklyn Radio (Mixcloud)

Leroy Smart

Posted in Channel One, Leroy Smart with tags , on September 24, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“A master of love songs and roots material, Leroy Smart has been on the reggae scene since the early ’70s. He was raised in Kingston’s Alpha Catholic Boys Home and began recording in the early ’70s. Smart worked with such producers as Gussie Clarke, Joe Joe Hookin, and Bunny Lee while gaining fame for a flamboyant performance style, exceptionally anguished delivery, and penetrating vocal manner. Smart‘s smashing voice often seemed about to collapse from anxiety and earnestness mid-song. He has continued to maintain his popularity, never scoring any crossover or international hits, but retaining his pull with the notoriously fickle Jamaican audience.”
allmusic
YouTube: Pride And Ambition b/w Version, Badness Don’t Pay b/w Version. The Fittest Shall Survive + Dub. LEROY SMART + THE WAILERS – Mother Liza + version, Wreck Up My Life

U-Roy – Version Galore (1971)

Posted in Riddims, U-Roy with tags , on September 17, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“‘All of a sudden, Jamaica awoke one morning and U-Roy was everywhere…’ – So read the original liner notes to this classic reggae LP, which originally hit in 1971 and washed over the island like a grooving tropical storm. U-Roy was a true reggae pioneer, dubbed The Originator for good reason. Bursting onto the Jamaican scene in the early 1970s, he pioneered the vocal approach called ‘toasting,’ which in addition to bringing Jamaican music into a new era, was also heavily influential on an American vocal style also in its infancy: rapping. This full-length, his first after a string of singles (mostly on the Treasure Isle and other Duke Reid labels, run by the famed producer and studio owner), rolls like a crazy party where a wobbly, but talented, ‘master of ceremonies’ grabs the mic and won’t let go. Speaking over and around songs that already have straight-ahead vocals on them, U-Roy shows the world why he is considered an iconoclast and trailblazer. In all honesty, there are few standouts on the album since they all run a similar course, and all are captivating in their own way. Modern listeners will especially note ‘Tide Is High,’ originally by the Paragons (featuring dulcet-toned vocalist John Holt) and recorded later as a 1980 smash hit by Blondie. Each track here is a new adventure, and while U-Roy’s approach might take some getting used to, it will eventually capture your ears as it did the entire island of Jamaica in the ‘60s and ‘70s. Sit back, drop the needle, and enjoy.”
get on down
YouTube: Version Galore (1971 Full Album)