Archive for the Jimmy Cliff Category

The Fantels – Hooligan (1977)

Posted in Jimmy Cliff, Joe Gibbs with tags , on January 16, 2018 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Some gwaan like hooligan, some act like maffia and some follow their path as a musician. In the case of Hal Anthony Lewinson this choice must not have been a hard one to make. Born into a musical family; Jimmy Cliff is his cousin and the Jamaicans’ Norris Weir is his uncle; it seems only logical Hal Lewinson ended up as a singer, songwriter and guitarist. Like Ken Boothe once sung, it’s the way nature planned it. And nature plotted it correct allright, because anno 2013 mister Lewinson is still going strong. From the minute he picks up the phone, Hal proofs himself a charismatic, enthusiastic and eager spokesman of reggae. Born in Frankfield, Jamaica (Clarendon) he joined his first group called The Beltones after they scored a major hit with ‘No More Heartaches‘ for Harry J in 1968. Whether or not this was the first ever reggae tune shall forever be open to debate, but the group did create a template for what was to come. The Beltones disbanded in the early 70’s due to financial discontentment. Leadsinger Trevor Shields went solo and Hal Lewinson joined the Fantels, who were also briefly known as The Beltones. …”
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YouTube: The Fantells – Hooligan + Version

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Roots Rock Reggae (1977)

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Inner Circle, Jimmy Cliff, Joe Higgs, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Robbie Shakespeare, Ska, Sly Dunbar, The Black Ark, The Mighty Diamonds, The Upsetters, Third World, U-Roy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 22, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“‘Roots Rock Reggae’ depicts an unforgettable moment in Jamaica’s history when music defined the island’s struggles and immortalised its heroes. Director Jeremy Marre films Bob Marley and the Wailers, and Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry record in his legendary Black Ark studio with The Upsetters. Jimmy Cliff rehearses with Sly and Robbie, while Inner Circle’s historic live gig is recorded on the violent Kingston streets. The legendary Abyssinians harmonise their haunting Rastafarian songs; Joe Higgs (formerly Bob Marley’s teacher) plays and talks; majestic toaster U Roy raps alongside The Mighty Diamonds, and Third World record in a Kingston studio. There is also early archive footage of Toots and the Maytals, and Haile Selessie’s royal visit to Jamaica while police and thieves battle it out on the streets, and the ghettos erupt in violence.”
YouTube: Roots Rock Reggae