Archive for Dub

Prince Allah – Naw Go A Funeral + Version (1978)

Posted in Dub, Joe Gibbs with tags , on July 28, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Keith Blake (born 10 May 1950), better known as Prince Alla (sometimes Prince Allah or Ras Allah) is a Jamaican roots reggae singer whose career began in the 1960s, and has continued with a string of releases into the 2000s. Born in St. Elizabeth, and raised in Denham Town, Kingston, Jamaica, Blake’s career began in the vocal group The Leaders with Milton Henry and Roy Palmer, who recorded three tracks for producer Joe Gibbs in the late 1960s. When The Leaders broke up, Blake continued to work with Gibbs, who issued his debut solo release, ‘Woo Oh Oh’. Blake had been interested in the Rastafari movement since he had a vision as a child, and in 1969, Blake’s Rastafarian faith saw him get heavily involved in Jamaica’s camp community, withdrawing from the music scene and living in Prince Emmanuel Edwards‘ camp at Bull Bay. …”
Wikipedia
YouTube: Naw Go A Funeral + Version

Joe Morgan – Basement session (1976)

Posted in Dub, Joe Morgan with tags , on June 26, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Lloyd Barnes’ Bullwackies studio, in the Bronx, surely was the best place to record deep roots reggae outside Jamaica. It’s most well known tunes were recorded in the early 80’s, when the studio’s sound had turned amazingly ‘Black Arkish’. But I’m even more fond of the original, and already particularly mystic sound it had in the 70’s. This chronicle of a New York basement party, featuring a fabulous horns line answering Joe Morgan’s vocal, is one my favourite from these days.”
Soul of Anbessa
YouTube: Basement Session

Ruffy & Tuffy

Posted in Augustus Pablo, Dub, Rockers International with tags , , on May 5, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Othis ‘Tuffy Radikal’ Newton is a singer of unique caliber. His special tone and expression are used to bridge culture and roots with dancehall. This mellow singer has a history in Reggae Music Fraternity, being half of the duo Ruffy and Tuffy, twin brothers. Both were born to a Rastafari Empress in the inner city of Kingston, Jamaica. His mother named him Otis after the great soul singer Otis Redding. He started his musical journey at the age of seven, singing in Nyabinghi choir, and made his first stage appearance dancing on stage with Bob Marley, and the I-Threes at age 13. Ruffy and Tuffy gained popularity with a song dating back to 1985 called ‘Take One Step’, which was released by Rockers International Label. This was followed by an album titled ‘Climax’ which was released in Europe two years later, consisting of four songs with the version on the flip side. Sales from the album was very encouraging, especially in Europe, and this helped spark another release in 1992 called ‘Harm no One’ and ‘Danger Zone’ produced by Augustus Pablo also on Rockers International Label. …”
Reggae Discography
YouTube: Take One Step + Dub, Harm No One / Augustus Pablo Version, If The 3rd World War Is A Must, The Day After + Version, Climax + Version, Beholld & Behold Dub

Joe Gibbs ‎– Dub Serial (1973)

Posted in Dub, Joe Gibbs with tags , on April 21, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


Greensleeves is re-releasing the first and long lost dub set by one of our alltime favourite producers Joe Gibbs. Originally issued circa 1973 alongside other classic early dub sets including Lee Perry’s Black Board Jungle and Rhythm Shower, Herman Chin-Loy’s Aquarius Dub, Randy’s Java Dub (mixed by Errol Thompson), Prince Buster’s The Message Dubwise and others. Virtually unheard since that time, it’s a dubhead’s dream come true, with early raw drum and bass cuts to Gibbs’s cut to Satta Massagana, Love Me Girl, Money In My Pocket and the killer cut to He Prayed used by Big Youth for his Foreman Vs Frasier. Spare on the effects, just a bit of echo and reverb and a couple of vicious tape rewinds. If you dig Joe’s African Dub chapters, you’ll need this album too. Dub Serial can also be found on cd in the boxset Evolution Of Dub Vol.1, also on Greensleeves.”
Elephant Soundsystem
YouTube: Dub serial 34:45

Carlton Jackson

Posted in Black Ark, Dub, Lee "Scratch" Perry with tags , , on March 20, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“b. c.1955, Greenwich Town, Jamaica, West Indies. Jackson began his musical career on the Ethiopian Hi Fi Sound System in the early 70s. To be a serious contender on the sound system circuit, the operators would secure unique dub plates, and this led Jackson to Lee Perry’s Black Ark studio in Washington Gardens. At the studio, Perry persuaded Jackson to record his debut, the timeless ‘History’. The song related the history of Afro-Caribbeans from slavery to the awakening of Rastafari: ‘I was bound in chains and taken to the Caribbean – The new faces that I met – Sayin’ they are my master – to teach I to be like fools – Jah Jah’. The song surfaced in the UK on a limited-edition Upsetter discomix, where it was snapped up by Perry enthusiasts, and it was later remixed and re-released in Jamaica on Jackson’s own Ital International label. Jackson followed the song with ‘Only Jah Can Do It’, but elected to concentrate on working with other artists, including the Soul Syndicate, Prince Allah, Sammy Dread and Bunny Wailer. There was a brief return to performing in 1982 when he recorded ‘Disarmament’, ably supported by Roots Radics. By the mid-80s he returned to production and promotional work in the USA on behalf of reggae. While based in New York, Jackson worked with a variety of contemporary dancehall singers, including Cocoa Tea, Pinchers and Sanchez. In the late 80s Jackson toured Europe with Pinchers and settled in London, when the release of Open The Gate, featuring ‘History’, ensured the performer cult status.”
allmusic
Carlton Jackson – History. This lyric contains biblical references.
YouTube: History Of Captivity, History (alternate Jamaican mix) (re) Lee Perry production, Disarmament (Ital International), Only Jah will do

Lee Perry Presents: Dub Treasure From The Black Ark (Rare Dubs 1976-1978)

Posted in Black Ark, Clancy Eccles, Coxsone Dodd, Dub, Lee "Scratch" Perry with tags , , , , on March 11, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Jamaican Recordings dust off a prime box of rare Lee Perry tricks, apparently from the Black Ark circa 1976-1978. The Black Ark was in operation from 1974 until the early ’80s when it suffered an unfortunate, and some might say inevitable, demise. Located in Perry’s back yard at 5 Washington Gardens, Kingston, JA, the studio’s equipment was modest compared with other setups on the island – including a Teac 4-track recorder, soundcraft mixing desk, Echoplex delay and phaser FX with a Roland RE201 Space Echo, but of course, it’s not what you got, it’s what you do with it that counts! And Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry made some of his most definitive tracks during this period, surrounded by an ever increasing circle of nyabinghi-playing Rastas. It’s that drumming and the sense of ‘whooshing; psychedelic space that defines the 16 tracks from this era and sets this body of work apart from the rest of his catalogue. Check out for the frivolous vibes of ‘Party Dub’, the tumbling dubble time syncopations of ‘Hot A Hot Dub’ or the CD only bonus cut ‘Baby Talk’, featuring the recurring (and occasionally disturbing) theme of babbling babies set amidst breathtakingly dynamic and dextrous FX. Killah sound.”
Boomkat

“Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry’s Black Ark Studio opened its doors in 1974. Situated in his backyard at 5 Washington Gardens,Kingston, Jamaica. Using only basic equipment, a Teac Four-Track Recorder, a Soundcraft mixing desk, an Echoplex delay unit and later adding a Phaser effects unit that he used in conjunction with his Roland RE201 Space Echo. He managed mixing down the tracks from Four track to Two track to make his distinctive whirling sound that sets apart the Black Ark Sound from the other Jamaican Studios. Born Rainford Hugh Perry, 28 March 1936, Hanover, Jamaica. He began his career at the grand age of 16, working for Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd’s sound system, rising quickly to the position of record scout and organising recording sessions during his 3 year period 1963-1966. Restlessness and unsatisfied with credit he felt due to him he moved on to work with Producers J.J. Johnson and Clancy Eccles, the later of which would help him set up his ‘Upsetter’ label in 1968,which would see his first of many recordings telling the injustices done to him by previous employers. ‘The Upsetter’ track itself pointed at Mr Dodd but reflected back to Perry when he inherited it as a nick name alongside many others during the course of his career, including ‘Scratch’, again taken from one of his recordings ‘Chicken Scratch’ recorded in 1965/1966. …”
Jamaican Recordings

iTunes, amazon

YouTube: Dub Treasures From The Black Ark Rare Dubs 1976-1978>/a> 50:15

Adrian Sherwood – Becoming A Cliché / Dub Cliché (2006)

Posted in Adrian Sherwood, Dub, On-U Sound with tags , , on March 6, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Producer Adrian Sherwood has spent the ’80s, ’90s and 2000s exerting an enormous influence on modern pop music, both as head of the avant-garde roots reggae hothouse known as On-U Sound Records and as producer and remixer to forward-thinking pop artists as diverse as Einsturzende Neubauten, Depeche Mode, Simply Red, and Nine Inch Nails. But it’s taken almost that long for him to finally release an album under his own name. His first solo effort was 2003’s multifariously brilliant Never Trust a Hippy; the follow-up finds him continuing to expand his musical horizons, keeping most of his grooves in an adventurously dubwise but still deeply rootsy reggae-funk vein while promiscuously incorporating any other musical tradition that happens to strike his fancy at the same time. … If you can get your hands on it, spend a little extra for the limited-edition package, which includes a second disc of dub remixes. Essential.”
allmusic
Discogs
YouTube: Dub Cliché, Becoming A Cliché (Full Album)