Archive for Blue Beat Records

Prince Buster

Posted in Blue Beat Records, Coxsone Dodd, Prince Buster with tags , , on September 12, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Lester Sterling, the celebrated saxophonist trained at Kingston’s famous Alpha Boys School and member of the legendary Skatalites, didn’t realize Jamaican music pioneer Prince Buster was so multitalented when he first met him. None of the big producers in the 1950s and Sixties, after all, were also musicians, singers or performers. … From biking around Kingston delivering records by hand to becoming one of the foundational giants in Jamaican music, Cecil ‘Prince Buster’ Campbell, who died on Thursday, left an enormous legacy as the King of Ska. The musician’s telltale bounce and clap of Jamaican ska is unmistakably as unique as its creator. …”
Rolling Stone – Prince Buster: Jamaica’s True Voice of the People (Video)
allmuic
Wikipedia
Guardian (Video)
Discogs
YouTube: Madness, Enjoy Yourself, One Step Beyond, Rough Rider, Al Capone, Ten Commandments, Lion Of Judah, 30 Pieces Of Silver, Wings Of A Dove, They Got To Come, They Got To Go, Hard Man Fe Dead, Black Head Chiniman, Whine And Grine (Behind Bars), Why Am I Treated So Bad (Dub), Sata A Miss Gana (Dub), Swing Low (Dub), Etc.

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Lord Creator – Evening News (1970)

Posted in Blue Beat Records, Lord Creator, Ska with tags , , on October 28, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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YouTube: Evening News

Rupie Edwards

Posted in Blue Beat Records, DJ, Dub, Rupie Edwards, Ska, Tommy McCook, U-Roy with tags , , , , , , on October 14, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Jamaica’s more eccentric producers get all the glory, but it was the less flamboyant Rupie Edwards who arguably made the biggest impact on the island’s music scene. As the inventor of the one-riddim album, and the first to popularize dub abroad, the singing producer signposted reggae’s path for posterity. Rupie was born in Goshen, Jamaica, on July 4, 1945, and his family moved to Kingston when he was 13. Talent shows beckoned, as did a career as a mechanic, but the singer was still in his teens when he cut his debut single, 1962’s ‘Guilty Convict.’ Duos were all the rage, and Edwards joined forces with Junior Menz as the Ambassadors, then added Dobby Dobson to create the vocal trio the Virtues. Their singles were sporadic, and so Rupie turned to self-production in 1966, self-producing four of the Virtues’ numbers, as well as a couple of solo cuts. By 1968 Edwards had had enough, and launched his own Success label and record shop, located at 136 1/2 Orange Street. Success’ name quickly became a self-fulfilling prophecy, with the reggae era splattered with its hits. Given his fine, warm tenor, Edwards’ stream of solo singles sold well, but he made his real mark with his productions of others. Veterans and stars-to-be both passed through his doors during the next few years, among them the Heptones, Bob Andy, Errol Dunkley, the Ethiopians, Joe Higgs, Dobby Dobson, and Dennis Alcapone. …”
allmusic

“Rupie Edwards (born Rupert Lloyd Edwards, 4 July 1945, Saint Ann Parish, Jamaica) is a Jamaican reggae singer and record producer. Rupie Edwards, an only child, moved to Kingston in 1958, where he set up his first band while still at school. His first recording was ‘Guilty Convict’ b/w ‘Just Because’, for L.S. ‘Little Wonder’ Smith in 1962, released on Melodisc’s Blue Beat label in the UK, and was paid £15 for the session. After recording a few singles, he became involved with the Virtues and, from 1968, started to focus only on his own productions. By the beginning of the 1970s, apart from releasing singles as a singer, he had recorded artists like The Heptones, Bob Andy, Johnny Clarke, Joe Higgs, Gregory Isaacs and The Ethiopians on his own record labels ‘Success’ and ‘Opportunity’. He also worked with DJs such as U-Roy and I-Roy, and released some instrumental versions with his studio band, The Rupie Edwards All Stars. The group included musicians such as saxophonist Tommy McCook, trombone player Vin Gordon, drummer Carlton ‘Santa’ Davis, guitarist Hux Brown, pianist Gladstone Anderson, bassist Clifton ‘Jackie’ Jackson and organist Winston Wright.”
Wikipedia

YouTube: The Yamaha Skank, – U Roy Junior – The Yamaha Skank – – Water House (King Tubby & Rupie Edwards) – Doctor Satan Echo Chamber — Shortie the President – President A Mash Up The Resident — Joe White – President Rock — Underground People – Rebel Dina (version) — The Uniques – My conversation, My little red top 12″, Rise And Fall / Rise In Dub (1976), Give me love and affection, I’m Gonna Live Some Life

Prince Buster – Al Capone / One Step Beyond (1964)

Posted in Blue Beat Records, Prince Buster, Ska with tags , , on June 29, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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YouTube: Al Capone / One Step Beyond

Clancy Eccles

Posted in Blue Beat Records, Clancy Eccles, Dancehall, Ska with tags , , , on June 17, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Though not nearly as well known as Duke Reid or Coxsone Dodd, producer and sometime vocalist Clancy Eccles made a lot of rocksteady in the late ’60s and early ’70s, much of it on his Clandisc label. As a singer, Eccles had started recording back in the late ’50s, when he cut some ska for Dodd. After bouncing around the ska and early reggae scene for a while, he became more active in the studio in the late ’60s, overseeing tracks by Alton Ellis, Joe Higgs, Beres Hammond, and several less-famed artists. Not as distinctive as the works of Reid or Dodd, Eccles’ oeuvre nonetheless included some solid and enjoyable material that contributed to the peak of the rocksteady movement. The record label he started in 1967, Clandisc Records, helped pave the way for greater recording independence for Jamaican musicians. Perhaps his greatest achievement took place outside of the studio: in the early ’70s, he organized a traveling stage show to contribute to the successful campaign of Jamaican socialist politician Michael Manley. Clancy Eccles passed away in 2005 at the age of 64, leaving behind a legacy of fine recordings both as a singer and as a producer.”
allmusic

“Clancy Eccles (9 December 1940, Dean Pen, St. Mary, Jamaica – 30 June 2005, Spanish Town, Jamaica) was a Jamaican ska and reggae singer, songwriter, arranger, promoter, record producer and talent scout. Known mostly for his early reggae works, he brought a political dimension to this music. His house band was known as The Dynamites. … Eccles had a Jamaican hit in 1961 with the early ska song ‘Freedom’, which was recorded in 1959, and was featured on Dodd’s sound system for two years before it was released. It was one of the first Jamaican songs with socially-oriented lyrics. The song discussed the concept of repatriation to Africa, an idea developed by the growing Rastafari movement. The song became the first Jamaican hit to be used for political purposes; Alexander Bustamante, founder of the Jamaican Labour Party and at that time Chief Minister of Jamaica adopted it for his fight against the Federation of the West Indies in 1960.”
Wikipedia

YouTube: Freedom, The Revenge, Feel the Rhythm, What Will Your Mama Say, River Jordan, I Jah, Revolution, Feel the ridim

Prince Buster – Madness (1964)

Posted in Blue Beat Records, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Prince Buster, Ska with tags , , , on April 25, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Prince Buster initially began composing this haunting classic while on his first tour of Britain back in 1964. Three years later, he would complete it, turning the song into a rocksteady classic. It’s unusual lyrical format — a letter to a friend — was borrowed from the literary world, and this was a favored writing device of Jamaican poets. However, Buster gives it all a twist, because he’s not writing to the living, but to the dead, enquiring after departed friends and acquaintances, and sending messages to his many late mates. It’s all set to an appropriately atmospheric melody, with Lee Perry providing the ghostly backing vocal and the interjected ‘ah, duppies’ (ghosts).”
allmusic
YouTube: Madness, Ghost Dance

Laurel Aitken – Boogie My Bones – The Early Years 57-60 (2010)

Posted in Blue Beat Records, Laurel Aitken, Ska with tags , , on March 25, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Laurel Aitken is mostly, and justly, known as a pioneer of ska, and by extension of early reggae as a whole. This intriguing collection, however, reaches back yet earlier in his and Jamaican music’s history, collecting 28 sides from 1957 to 1960 that even predate ska’s emergence. You can hear hints, and sometimes very strong ones, of the ska that would became the rage in Jamaican pop in the early to mid-’60s. Yet there’s at least as much mento, particularly on the earlier tracks, as well as heavy strains of R&B, doo wop, and early rock & roll. In hindsight all of these elements were crucial to the recipe for ska and reggae, but back then the ska/reggae ingredients sometimes weren’t all that audible, especially in the mento cuts that sound close to calypso. But even if these varied blends don’t quite find Aitken hitting his stride, they’re pretty enjoyable numbers anyway, with an almost constant sense of effervescent fun. By the time of the Duke Reid-produced songs ‘Judgment Day’ (with Rico Rodriguez on trombone) and ‘More Whisky,’ Aitken’s verging on all-out ska, and these might be the tracks that find most favor with purist ska and reggae lovers. But open-eared listeners will get a lot out of most of the tracks, including ones that borrow heavily from ’50s American R&B (‘Love Me Baby’) and boogie (‘Boogie in My Bones,’ a 1960 number one Jamaican hit). There aren’t many anthologies on which the transition from mento to ska is so evident, making this not just a welcome entry in the Aitken discography, but a notable release for anyone with an interest in the birth of ska.”
allmusic

YouTube: Boogie My Bones, Ghana Independence They Go It, Nebuchnezer, Sweet Chariot, Come back Jeannie, Boogie Rock, Honey Girl, Low Down Dirty Girl