Archive for the Nora Dean Category

Rude Reggae: Rough Riders

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Laurel Aitken, Max Romeo, Nora Dean, Prince Buster, Ska with tags , , , , , on July 27, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“We are back with another Reggae article! ‘Rude Reggae – Rough Riders’ has been taken from a Black Music Magazine from 1974. It was, in fact, part of a special called Sexy Soul, Blue Blues and Rude Reggae. The author of the Reggae section was Carl Gayle, as usual, providing an entertaining and interesting read. … At its worst, rude reggae can plumb the depths of childish smut. At its best, it has an earthy and unselfconscious directness which can make the prudest of prudes explode with laughter. Rude reggae has always been around, but it wasn’t until about two years ago that most British record buyers got their first mild taste of it through the work of the jokey, amiable Judge Dread and his ‘Big Six’ (later followed by ‘Big Seven’ and ‘Big Eight’). ‘Big Six’ was banned by the BBC, which boosted its sales. But in truth Dread’s songs are pretty tame and it is significant that his most suggestive track, ‘Dr. Kitch’, is not his own song but simply a version of the original calypso by Lord Kitchener, issued in Britain a decade ago on the fielding Island label – Jump Up- (and covered by Georgie Fame). …”
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“… One of Buster’s first rude records was ‘Rough Rider’, released in 1968. The subject of the song is a duel between the consenting couple in which the singer is clearly in some discomfort after losing the first round: ‘She was a rough rider, cool stroker, strong winner. . . / I had a hard night, last night”. A year later Buster was revealing frustration in ‘Wreck a Pum Pum’ with similar aggression: ‘I want a girl to wreck her pum pum / and if she ugly I don’t mind / I have a . . . and I want a grind.’ If there’s one singer who’s had as much influence as Buster on later Jamaican rude records it has to be the inimitable Laurel Aitken, who seems to be at his best when he’s being vulgar. ‘Fire In Your Wire’ was a ‘shocker’ when it appeared in 1968 as much for Aitken’s gruff, exaggerated vocal style as for the potently suggestive music and lyrics. …”
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“… The first set of rude records came from the ‘ska’ era. Justin Hines and The Dominoes made the most notable contribution in this field, Hines’ extravagantly ethnic vocal style lent itself well to the group’s two best known suggestive songs, ‘Penny Reel’ and ‘Rub Up Push Up’. In the latter, he suggests an ideal ways of making it up after a quarrel: ‘You rub up, you push up, you love up because you know you were wrong’. The Heptones’ biggest selling record ‘Fatty Fatty’ (1967) was their first ever record and was their only flirtation with the rude medium. It’s a cool atmospheric rocksteady song exposing the singer’s frustration as he begins to look forward to what he’d like to be doing tonight. …”
The Ballroom Blitz
bangbanglulu
YouTube: Judge Dread – Big Six, Lord Kitchener – Dr. Kitch aka The Needle (1963), Prince Buster & All Stars – Rough Rider, Prince Buster – Wreck A Pum Pum, Laurel Aitken – Pussy Price, Justin Hines And The Dominoes – Rub Up Push Up, The Heptones – Fattie Fattie, Derrick Morgan – Kill Me Dead, Lloyd Terrel – Bang Bang Lulu, Max Romeo – Wet Dream, Nora Dean – Barbwire, Wailing Wailers – Bend Down Low

Nora Dean – Must get a man (1970)

Posted in Duke Reid, Nora Dean, Ska with tags , , on May 12, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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YouTube: Must get a man