Archive for August, 2017

I Roy – Trust No Shadow After Dark (1979)

Posted in Bunny Lee, Channel One, I-Roy, Joe Gibbs, Riddims with tags , , , , on August 17, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“The late, great I Roy will forever be remembered for his phenomenal work for producers like Gussie Clarke, Lee Perry and Bunny Lee. Or his association with the Channel One studio. Or his famous feuds with Prince Jazzbo, which were recorded and released in a series of very entertaining records. Or maybe even for the tragic end of his life: when I Roy left this world he was suffering from ill health, was homeless and had just found out his son was killed in prison. Being the legend he was, all material recorded by the man is definitely worth checking out, but in all fairness: his greatest work was captured by other producers and he won’t be remembered for his output for Joe Gibbs. I Roy didn’t record much for Joe to begin with, a few good tunes here and there and an album produced by Bunny Lee in 1979 (which is pretty good, Johnny Clarke sings the melody parts) and that’s it. That said, this recording from 1975 is quite a gem. I Roy sounds upbeat and seems well at home riding the awkward stepping riddim, which updates the Meditations’ ‘Woman is like a shadow.’ Laughing, growling and toasting his way through the track, this makes for one of the finer obscure I Roy records out there. It’s one of those overlooked recordings that turn out a catch when you find it and makes you wonder why it isn’t featured on more compilations out there. In the case of I Roy the answer to that question might be because his back-catalogue of hits is just too large and this isn’t one of them. Don’t let that bother you, though. It makes it all the more worthwhile to track this 7 inch down. …”
Pressure Beat (Audio)
YouTube: Trust No Shadow After Dark

Prince Alla – Bosrah (1976)

Posted in Black Ark, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Prince Alla with tags , , on August 9, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Those familiar with the biblical story of King Melchizedek may mistakenly believe that Prince Alla is paying tribute to that most esteemed of regal priests. Their confusion is understandable, though, for roots artists often give a Rastafarian twist to a Biblical verse, in Alla‘s case, Hebrews 7:3. The Old Testament held up Melchizedek as the quintessential priest and the most righteous of religious men, but listeners learn more of him from the apostle Paul, who told the Hebrews that Melchizedek was also a ‘king of peace, without father, without mother, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life…abideth a priest continually.’ Although Alla paraphrases this verse, he’s not referring to the King of Salem at all; in fact, he’s actually paying tribute to Prince Edward Emmanuel. This Rastafarian elder was leader of the Bobo sect to which Alla belongs, and had often drawn parallels between himself and Melchizedek. Tapper Zukie was thoroughly impressed with the Prince‘s homage. Just out of his teens, the young DJ was eager to cross into production, and ‘Bosrah’ was to become one of his first recordings. The toaster and singer set to work at the Black Ark studio, with Lee Perry stepping in to help with the arrangement. Alla‘s preaching is suitably bold, while behind him Roy ‘Soft’ Palmer and Melodian Tony Brevett add their own strong, close harmonies. The fabulous riddim is a fiery version of Burning Spear‘s ‘Joe Frazier,’ which Zukie would remix for his own In Dub album. the Prince‘s single, credited to Ras Allah & the Prophets, was originally released in Jamaica by Vivian ‘Yabby You’ Jackson, and then by Zukie‘s own Stars label, before being picked up for U.K. consumption by K&B Records. – Jo-Ann Greene”
allmusic
amazon: Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae
YouTube: Bosrah

Bob Soul / King Tubby / Billy Hutch

Posted in Augustus Pablo with tags on August 5, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“At long last, in proper quality and officially licensed, we present a pair of records long worked at, historically important, largely unheard, and most of all, musically brilliant. Above all, the dub mixes on these records are known among connoisseurs as being among a handful which can not only be considered a definitive King Tubby’s style statement, but also among the most radical, transformative and forward thinking mixes ever committed to tape by the King himself. This is proper King Tubby’s music; Tubby the man, not just Tubby’s the studio. These two 12″s represent most of the known cuts of this brilliant rhythm, played by the Wailers’ Barrett brothers, alongside Earl Chinna Smith, Augustus Pablo and Gladdy Anderson, all together truly a rhythmic force to be reckoned with. ‘Message from the Congo’ and ‘God Is Love’ are two vocals cuts produced via the mid 1970’s partnership of Milton ‘Billy Hutch’ Hutchinson and the late Linton ‘Bob Soul’ Williamson. …”
DKR Brooklyn
YouTube: Message From The Congo / King Tubby – Congo Dread Chapter 1, King Tubby and Sampson – Drums Of Love