Archive for Lee “Scratch” Perry

Carlton Jackson

Posted in Black Ark, Dub, Lee "Scratch" Perry with tags , , on March 20, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“b. c.1955, Greenwich Town, Jamaica, West Indies. Jackson began his musical career on the Ethiopian Hi Fi Sound System in the early 70s. To be a serious contender on the sound system circuit, the operators would secure unique dub plates, and this led Jackson to Lee Perry’s Black Ark studio in Washington Gardens. At the studio, Perry persuaded Jackson to record his debut, the timeless ‘History’. The song related the history of Afro-Caribbeans from slavery to the awakening of Rastafari: ‘I was bound in chains and taken to the Caribbean – The new faces that I met – Sayin’ they are my master – to teach I to be like fools – Jah Jah’. The song surfaced in the UK on a limited-edition Upsetter discomix, where it was snapped up by Perry enthusiasts, and it was later remixed and re-released in Jamaica on Jackson’s own Ital International label. Jackson followed the song with ‘Only Jah Can Do It’, but elected to concentrate on working with other artists, including the Soul Syndicate, Prince Allah, Sammy Dread and Bunny Wailer. There was a brief return to performing in 1982 when he recorded ‘Disarmament’, ably supported by Roots Radics. By the mid-80s he returned to production and promotional work in the USA on behalf of reggae. While based in New York, Jackson worked with a variety of contemporary dancehall singers, including Cocoa Tea, Pinchers and Sanchez. In the late 80s Jackson toured Europe with Pinchers and settled in London, when the release of Open The Gate, featuring ‘History’, ensured the performer cult status.”
allmusic
Carlton Jackson – History. This lyric contains biblical references.
YouTube: History Of Captivity, History (alternate Jamaican mix) (re) Lee Perry production, Disarmament (Ital International), Only Jah will do

Lee Perry Presents: Dub Treasure From The Black Ark (Rare Dubs 1976-1978)

Posted in Black Ark, Clancy Eccles, Coxsone Dodd, Dub, Lee "Scratch" Perry with tags , , , , on March 11, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Jamaican Recordings dust off a prime box of rare Lee Perry tricks, apparently from the Black Ark circa 1976-1978. The Black Ark was in operation from 1974 until the early ’80s when it suffered an unfortunate, and some might say inevitable, demise. Located in Perry’s back yard at 5 Washington Gardens, Kingston, JA, the studio’s equipment was modest compared with other setups on the island – including a Teac 4-track recorder, soundcraft mixing desk, Echoplex delay and phaser FX with a Roland RE201 Space Echo, but of course, it’s not what you got, it’s what you do with it that counts! And Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry made some of his most definitive tracks during this period, surrounded by an ever increasing circle of nyabinghi-playing Rastas. It’s that drumming and the sense of ‘whooshing; psychedelic space that defines the 16 tracks from this era and sets this body of work apart from the rest of his catalogue. Check out for the frivolous vibes of ‘Party Dub’, the tumbling dubble time syncopations of ‘Hot A Hot Dub’ or the CD only bonus cut ‘Baby Talk’, featuring the recurring (and occasionally disturbing) theme of babbling babies set amidst breathtakingly dynamic and dextrous FX. Killah sound.”
Boomkat

“Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry’s Black Ark Studio opened its doors in 1974. Situated in his backyard at 5 Washington Gardens,Kingston, Jamaica. Using only basic equipment, a Teac Four-Track Recorder, a Soundcraft mixing desk, an Echoplex delay unit and later adding a Phaser effects unit that he used in conjunction with his Roland RE201 Space Echo. He managed mixing down the tracks from Four track to Two track to make his distinctive whirling sound that sets apart the Black Ark Sound from the other Jamaican Studios. Born Rainford Hugh Perry, 28 March 1936, Hanover, Jamaica. He began his career at the grand age of 16, working for Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd’s sound system, rising quickly to the position of record scout and organising recording sessions during his 3 year period 1963-1966. Restlessness and unsatisfied with credit he felt due to him he moved on to work with Producers J.J. Johnson and Clancy Eccles, the later of which would help him set up his ‘Upsetter’ label in 1968,which would see his first of many recordings telling the injustices done to him by previous employers. ‘The Upsetter’ track itself pointed at Mr Dodd but reflected back to Perry when he inherited it as a nick name alongside many others during the course of his career, including ‘Scratch’, again taken from one of his recordings ‘Chicken Scratch’ recorded in 1965/1966. …”
Jamaican Recordings

iTunes, amazon

YouTube: Dub Treasures From The Black Ark Rare Dubs 1976-1978>/a> 50:15

Lee “Scratch” Perry – Black Ark in Dub (1977)

Posted in Black Ark, Lee "Scratch" Perry with tags , on August 31, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“A fine collection of early Perry dub packaged in what seems to be a semi-legit, bootleg way. This label seems to be tied in with the French label Lagoon, which has released the Perry-produced Bob Marley session (two CDs, both of them essential). This is a good selection; Perry remixes are typically audacious and crazy, but there’s little enclosed information telling you when the tracks were cut. Lack of information is an ongoing problem with Perry releases, since his entire output defies any kind of authoritative historical treatment. Still, this is worthy of your time, even if it doesn’t provide the big buzz of some of Perry’s other, more far-out experiments.”
allmusic
YouTube: Black Ark in Dub 57:32

Lacksley Castell (1959 – 1983)

Posted in Augustus Pablo, Hugh Mundell, Junior Reid, Lacksley Castell, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Prince Jammy with tags , , , , , on June 29, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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Wikipedia – “Lacksley Castell, sometimes misspelled Laxley, Lacksly, Lasky or Locksley Castel (1959 – 1983) was a Jamaican reggae singer best known for his work in the early 1980s. Lacksley Castell was born in 1959, although some sources claim 1962. Growing up in Kingston‘s Waterhouse district, along with artists such as Black Uhuru and The Travellers, Lacksley recorded in what was known as the ‘Waterhouse style’. Castell became friends with Hugh Mundell who helped both him and his friend Junior Reid to get started in the music business. That resulted in Castell’s first single releases in 1978, ‘Babylon World’ and ‘Love in Your Heart’, recorded with Augustus Pablo. In 1979, he recorded ‘Jah Love Is Sweeter’ at Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry‘s Black Ark Studios, which was a pre-release reggae chart hit in the United Kingdom in August 1979, with ‘What a Great Day’ (produced by Prince Jammy) making the top five of the reggae 12-inch singles chart the same month. …”
Wikipedia
Discogs
YouTube: “Babylon World” and “Babylon Fall (version)”, Love In Your Heart, What a Great Day (& dub), Jah Love Is Sweeter + King Tubby’s Mix, My Collie Tree, African Queen, Unkind To Myself + Dub (NEGUS ROOTS), Jah Is Watching You, Government Man + Sly & Robbie – Dub The Government, Speak Softly, Tug A War Games, Johnny Brown + Version, Jah-Children (& Dub), Mother Mitchell (Far East Riddim), & Gregory Isaacs – Clash 12inch

Dub Chill Out (1996)

Posted in Augustus Pablo, Dub, King Jammy, King Tubby, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Robbie Shakespeare, Scientist, Sly Dunbar with tags , , , , , , , on August 2, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

Ongu-O2+L
“An 18-cut anthology of reggae dub music that, while certainly not perfectly balanced or comprehensive, does a good job in presenting some outstanding creations of several leading dub progenitors. Although leading dub lights King Tubby, King Jammy, Lee Perry, Sly & Robbie, and Scientist are on board, it might be called King Tubby and friends, as he has eight of the 18 selections, sharing billing on a couple with Augustus Pablo. Scientist, by contrast, only has one cut. More important than even distribution, however, is the quality of the individual tracks, which is pretty high, and very heavy on massive reverb, odd percussion, and special effects, as it should be. Listen to Lee Perry’s ‘Upsetting’ for particularly far-out percussion-echo dueling; King Jammy’s ‘Slow Motion’ has the kind of bass that shreds the speaker, with echo that fades away like snowflakes on a warm day. Sometimes there are vocals, sometimes not; vocals in this context, of course, are just another instrument or sound effect, not the tool for a singer’s expression, as they usually are. It would be nice to have some dates or source documentation for the songs; there’s not even a rough indication of the chronological span of the music on the disc. But it’s a good anthology, especially for listeners who want some, but not a ton, of dub on their shelves.”
allmusic

YouTube: Dub Chill Out (Full Album)

Max Romeo – Every Man Ought To Know (1973)

Posted in Bunny Lee, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Max Romeo with tags , , on June 3, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“The origins of this song, originally featured on Max Romeo’s incendiary Revelation Time album of 1975, are interesting. The instrumental part had initially been recorded by the Upsetters under the direction of Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry as a backing track for Leo Graham, who recorded the nursery rhyme in a relatively straight manner. The rhythm proved popular enough that it was subsequently used, as was customary at the time, by several other artists as well, notably the deejays I Roy and Dillinger. Perry himself joined forces with the Ethiopians to record ‘I Am a Dreadlocks’ over the same rhythm, as a volley in what was then an ongoing dispute between Rastafarians who wore dreadlocks and those who did not. But the most powerful interpretation of the ‘Three Blind Mice’ rhythm was this one, on which Romeo uses the nursery-rhyme theme as a departure point for a bitter denunciation of police harrassment in the Rastafarian community. Perry’s splashy and dense production style is a perfect fit for the nervous and outraged lyrics, and the simplictic melody adds an element of bitter sarcasm to the song.”
allmusic

YouTube: Every Man Ought To Know, Three Blind Mice

Judge Winchester – Public Jestering (1974)

Posted in Black Ark, Dub, Lee "Scratch" Perry with tags , , on May 26, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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YouTube: Public Jestering