Archive for the Clancy Eccles Category

Lee Perry Presents: Dub Treasure From The Black Ark (Rare Dubs 1976-1978)

Posted in Black Ark, Clancy Eccles, Coxsone Dodd, Dub, Lee "Scratch" Perry with tags , , , , on March 11, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Jamaican Recordings dust off a prime box of rare Lee Perry tricks, apparently from the Black Ark circa 1976-1978. The Black Ark was in operation from 1974 until the early ’80s when it suffered an unfortunate, and some might say inevitable, demise. Located in Perry’s back yard at 5 Washington Gardens, Kingston, JA, the studio’s equipment was modest compared with other setups on the island – including a Teac 4-track recorder, soundcraft mixing desk, Echoplex delay and phaser FX with a Roland RE201 Space Echo, but of course, it’s not what you got, it’s what you do with it that counts! And Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry made some of his most definitive tracks during this period, surrounded by an ever increasing circle of nyabinghi-playing Rastas. It’s that drumming and the sense of ‘whooshing; psychedelic space that defines the 16 tracks from this era and sets this body of work apart from the rest of his catalogue. Check out for the frivolous vibes of ‘Party Dub’, the tumbling dubble time syncopations of ‘Hot A Hot Dub’ or the CD only bonus cut ‘Baby Talk’, featuring the recurring (and occasionally disturbing) theme of babbling babies set amidst breathtakingly dynamic and dextrous FX. Killah sound.”
Boomkat

“Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry’s Black Ark Studio opened its doors in 1974. Situated in his backyard at 5 Washington Gardens,Kingston, Jamaica. Using only basic equipment, a Teac Four-Track Recorder, a Soundcraft mixing desk, an Echoplex delay unit and later adding a Phaser effects unit that he used in conjunction with his Roland RE201 Space Echo. He managed mixing down the tracks from Four track to Two track to make his distinctive whirling sound that sets apart the Black Ark Sound from the other Jamaican Studios. Born Rainford Hugh Perry, 28 March 1936, Hanover, Jamaica. He began his career at the grand age of 16, working for Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd’s sound system, rising quickly to the position of record scout and organising recording sessions during his 3 year period 1963-1966. Restlessness and unsatisfied with credit he felt due to him he moved on to work with Producers J.J. Johnson and Clancy Eccles, the later of which would help him set up his ‘Upsetter’ label in 1968,which would see his first of many recordings telling the injustices done to him by previous employers. ‘The Upsetter’ track itself pointed at Mr Dodd but reflected back to Perry when he inherited it as a nick name alongside many others during the course of his career, including ‘Scratch’, again taken from one of his recordings ‘Chicken Scratch’ recorded in 1965/1966. …”
Jamaican Recordings

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YouTube: Dub Treasures From The Black Ark Rare Dubs 1976-1978>/a> 50:15

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King Stitt – Coxsone Downbeat Dancehall ‘ 63 Party (1992), Reggae, Fire, Beat (2008)

Posted in Clancy Eccles, Coxsone Dodd, DJ, King Stitt, Studio One with tags , , , on May 16, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Born Winston Cooper, King Stitt was one of the early DJs on the reggae scene. Spotted by Count Machuki at a dance, Stitt was asked to try his hand at DJing because of his spectacular dance moves. Born with facial disfigurement, Stitt used it as a gimmick, taking advantage of the islanders’ love for Westerns and calling himself the Ugly, after Sergio Leone’s The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Initially, people went to his shows to find out if he really was ugly or not. After a time, he came into his own as a DJ without needing the gimmick, using ideas taken from radio DJs in Miami and New Orleans that came over the broadcasts to Jamaica. He began working with Coxsone Dodd, and then moved on to Clancy Eccles, with whom he produced a number of works that met with success in both Jamaica and the U.K.– ‘Fire Corner,’ ‘Herbman Shuffle,’ and ‘Van Cleef’ (because Lee Van Cleef was the ‘ugly one’ in the movie). Now, he works at Coxsone’s Studio One from time to time.”
allmusic

YouTube: King Stitt Coxsone Downbeat Dancehall ‘ 63 PARTY – Studio 1 (1 roland alponso – four corners 2 owen gray – on the beach 3 coxsone dodd – the shock 4 coxsone dodd – paradise plum), Reggae, Fire, Beat, King Alpha (The Beginning), Dance Beat 1, Jump For Joy, Soul Language, Herbsman Shuffle, Lick It Back, Lee Van Cleef, On The Street, Vigorton Two, Oh Yeah, Fire Corner, I For I, In The City, Rub A Dub, Sounds Of The 70’s, Christmas Tree, King Of Kings, Queen Omega (The End)

King Stitt – Fire Corner / Herbsman Shuffle (1969)

Posted in Clancy Eccles, Coxsone Dodd, King Stitt with tags , , on April 18, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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YouTube: Fire Corner, Herbsman Shuffle

Clancy Eccles

Posted in Blue Beat Records, Clancy Eccles, Dancehall, Ska with tags , , , on June 17, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Though not nearly as well known as Duke Reid or Coxsone Dodd, producer and sometime vocalist Clancy Eccles made a lot of rocksteady in the late ’60s and early ’70s, much of it on his Clandisc label. As a singer, Eccles had started recording back in the late ’50s, when he cut some ska for Dodd. After bouncing around the ska and early reggae scene for a while, he became more active in the studio in the late ’60s, overseeing tracks by Alton Ellis, Joe Higgs, Beres Hammond, and several less-famed artists. Not as distinctive as the works of Reid or Dodd, Eccles’ oeuvre nonetheless included some solid and enjoyable material that contributed to the peak of the rocksteady movement. The record label he started in 1967, Clandisc Records, helped pave the way for greater recording independence for Jamaican musicians. Perhaps his greatest achievement took place outside of the studio: in the early ’70s, he organized a traveling stage show to contribute to the successful campaign of Jamaican socialist politician Michael Manley. Clancy Eccles passed away in 2005 at the age of 64, leaving behind a legacy of fine recordings both as a singer and as a producer.”
allmusic

“Clancy Eccles (9 December 1940, Dean Pen, St. Mary, Jamaica – 30 June 2005, Spanish Town, Jamaica) was a Jamaican ska and reggae singer, songwriter, arranger, promoter, record producer and talent scout. Known mostly for his early reggae works, he brought a political dimension to this music. His house band was known as The Dynamites. … Eccles had a Jamaican hit in 1961 with the early ska song ‘Freedom’, which was recorded in 1959, and was featured on Dodd’s sound system for two years before it was released. It was one of the first Jamaican songs with socially-oriented lyrics. The song discussed the concept of repatriation to Africa, an idea developed by the growing Rastafari movement. The song became the first Jamaican hit to be used for political purposes; Alexander Bustamante, founder of the Jamaican Labour Party and at that time Chief Minister of Jamaica adopted it for his fight against the Federation of the West Indies in 1960.”
Wikipedia

YouTube: Freedom, The Revenge, Feel the Rhythm, What Will Your Mama Say, River Jordan, I Jah, Revolution, Feel the ridim