Archive for the Jah Woosh Category

Bim Sherman meets Horace Andy and U black – In A Rub A Dub Style (1979)

Posted in Bim Sherman, DJ, Horace Andy, Jah Woosh, King Tubby, Prince Jammy, Studio One with tags , , , , , , on July 13, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Originally released in 1982, this killer slab combines the talents of two of reggae’s greatest male vocalists: the smoking DJ and producer Jah Whoosh, and Prince Jammy at Studio 1 and King Tubby’s. Not that any other recommendation is necessary, but while we’re at it, all of the tracks are eerie and atmospheric in soulful dub style, played by Leroy Wallace, Sly Dunbar, Errol Flabba Holt, Bingy Bunny, Ansel Collins, and others. Of the ten tracks here, six feature the A-sides with the combined dub flipsides tacked onto the ends. It works like a charm. A clear standout is Bim Sherman’s opener, ‘It Must Be a Dream,’ with the dubwise elements added after his extended vocal, including a killer trombone solo by Vincent Gordon. Horace Andy’s babymaker ‘Tonight’ is the dub version, but there’s enough of his utterly sensual vocal to make the dread elements of dub come through in the track’s eroticism. ‘Dread Pan Some’ and its dub feature U. Black and Andy interweaving their vocals together. Black’s DJ toasting style is not as radically in your face as some of his predecessors, though it’s just as effective in this context. This collection culls some rare tracks, and places them in a sequence that maximizes the dubwise trance elements and possesses true dread force. Recommended.”
allmusic
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YouTube: Bim Sherman meets Horace Andy and U black – In A Rub A Dub Style

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Jah Woosh

Posted in Adrian Sherwood, DJ, Dub, Jah Woosh with tags , , , on July 3, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“In a crowded field, toaster Jah Woosh — born Neville Beckford in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1952 — left his mark on the roots age with a string of popular singles and a series of seminal albums. Haile Selassie’s 1966 state visit to Jamaica prompted Beckford’s conversion to Rastafarianism, and Prince Lloyd’s Sound System made an equal musical impact, providing a launching pad for Beckford’s career. He teamed up with friend Reggae George as Neville & George, but the pair famously failed auditions for both Coxsone Dodd and Duke Reid, bringing the partnership to a swift end. George Bell, however, sent the newly christened Jah Woosh into the studio in 1972, although ‘Morwell Rock’ never gained a proper release. …”
allmusic

“Neville Beckford (1952 – 21 February 2011), better known as Jah Woosh, was a Jamaican reggae deejay and record producer, primarily known for his work in the 1970s. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Beckford served an apprenticeship as a mechanic before forming a duo with Reggae George, Neville & George, and auditioning for Jamaica’s top producers. Unsuccessful as a duo, they both went on to solo careers. Beckford became the resident deejay on Prince Lloyd’s sound system, and was noticed by producer George Bell, who took him into the studio to record ‘Angela Davis’, now under the pseudonym Jah Woosh. Although the single was not a hit, it prompted Rupie Edwards to produce the debut album, Jah Woosh, released in 1974 on the United Kingdom Cactus label. Chalice Blaze and Psalms of Wisdom followed in 1976, these three albums establishing a reputation in the UK. A string of albums and singles followed through the 1970s and early 1980s. Woosh also contributed to Adrian Sherwood’s Singers & Players collective.”
Wikiedia

YouTube: So We Stay, Goosie Leg, Walls Of Babylon, Dread Situation (Psalms Of Wisdom), Psalm 121, Guiding Star / Guiding Star Dub, Religious Dread, Live Upright, African Sound, Shine Eye Girl (D.J Legend)