Archive for the Sylvan Morris Category

Joe White – Jah Jah Dub (1975)

Posted in Dub, Harry Johnson, Joe White, Sylvan Morris with tags , , , on February 1, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“… This album presents some nice dub cuts from Harry Johnson’s studio. It brings together the best tracks from three very hard to find dub albums from the seventies; Joe White – Jah Jah dub (Roosevelt), Cultural Dub (Harry J) and Sylvan Morris – Morris on dub (Jay wax). The sound quality from this 180 grams vinyl album is splendid! Most tracks come straight from master tape and are technically well cleaned and transferred. As a master sound engineer Sylvan Morris will be very satisfied! In all the tracks you can hear the sound quality of Harry J`s Studio and Sylvan Morris` approach. Technically and musically the balance in the music is great. The dubs may sound a bit less raw than some of the other studio`s that marked the sound of Jamaican dub music in the seventies, but they are certainly not less attractive. You can hear the work of a top quality sound engineer. What also makes this set attractive is that most versions are recognizable and well known riddims.”
Harry J, Joe White & Sylvan Morris – Roosevelt Ave. Dub 1975 – 1978

YouTube: Jah Jah Dub, Under world rock,
DailyMotion: Roots dub
Grooveshark: Peace Pipe Dub

Dub Specialist ‎– Hi Fashion Dub Top Ten (1974)

Posted in Dub, Studio One, Sylvan Morris with tags , , on November 9, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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YouTube: Hi Fashion Dub Top Ten 27:22

Burning Spear – The Whole A We Suffer b/w Children Of Today (1978)

Posted in Burning Spear, Dub, Sylvan Morris with tags , , on September 15, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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YouTube: The Whole A We Suffer b/w Children Of Today

Sylvan Morris

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Burning Spear, Coxsone Dodd, Dub, Ska, Studio One, Sylvan Morris with tags , , , , , , on March 20, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Sylvan Morris worked as a recording and mixing engineer at the forefront of the development of Jamaican music in the 1960s and 1970s. Equipped with a pitch perfect ear, a naturally inventive spirit, a hands-on approach and an intense work ethic Morris not only managed to create a sound of his own, but also was highly sought after by the musicians of the era, to whom he was affectionately known as ‘My Operator.’ Over the course of a quarter century Morris worked closely with such luminaries as Bob Marley and the Wailers, Jacob Miller, The Heptones, U-Roy, Augustus Pablo, Alton Ellis, Gregory Isaacs, Dennis Brown and many more. Born in Trenchtown, Kingston, Jamaica in 1946, Morris, early on, exhibited a natural enthusiasm and talent for fixing electronics. Having built his first tube amplifier by age 12, he was the go-to guy in the neighborhood for anything electronic that needed to be fixed.”
Sylvan Morris | Interview

Harry J
“Harry Zephaniah Johnson (known as Harry J, born July 6, 1945, Westmoreland) is a Jamaican reggae record producer of African, Sicilian and Scottish descent. He is the head of the landmark Harry J. Records, located at 10 Roosevelt Avenue, Kingston 6, Jamaica WI. … In 1972, Harry Johnson sold his record shop and set up his own recording studio ‘Harry J’, on 10 Roosevelt Avenue, Uptown Kingston, where he employed Sid Bucknor and later Sylvan Morris as resident recording engineer. Harry J Studio soon became one of the most famous Jamaican studios after having recorded several Bob Marley & The Wailers albums from 1973 to 1976 before the Tuff Gong era; such as Rastaman Vibration and Catch A Fire.”
Wikipedia

Sylvan Morris & Harry J – Cultural Dub
“Harry Johnson, or Harry J as he’s better known to fans around the world, was a prolific producer of top-notch reggae, and continues to run one of Jamaica’s most legendary studios. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1945, after leaving school Johnson worked as an insurance salesman. Interest in music, however, led him to schedule time at Studio One in 1968 to record the vocal group the Beltones. The resulting single, ‘No More Heartaches,’ was a hit, the first of many. Lloyd Robinson’s seminal — and much versioned — ‘Cuss Cuss’ arrived the following year, as did a slew of sizzling instrumentals from Johnson’s studio band, the Harry J All-Stars.”
Zero G Sound

Roots Archives

YouTube: Sylvan Morris & Harry J. Feat Big Youth – Neighbour Dub, Sugar Plum Dub, Sylvan Morris & Harry J Cultural – River Of Babylon, Reggae In Harmony, Roots Style – Coxsone Dodd/Sylvan Morris, Baba Boom- The Jamaicans, Baba Boom- The Jamaicans, ROY SHIRLEY – HOLD THEM, Jacob Miller – Wanted