Archive for July, 2016

Bob Andy – War In City + Version (1976)

Posted in Bob Andy, Dub with tags , on July 29, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

img273_m
“… War in the City, an upbeat rockers-style tune infused with serious horns, released on the Jam-Rock label. ‘It was actually done by me and…Alphonso Small,’ said Andy. ‘He’s a cousin of Dennis Brown. They shot him and killed (him) in New York. He was one of those persons you just couldn’t envision, couldn’t imagine, him being in a coffin. Al was the guy who had the idea for War in the City…I finished the lyrics, we both financed it. That never even play for a month in Jamaica.'”
Blood and Fire
W – Bob Andy
YouTube: War In The City / Version

Advertisements

Burning Spear – Bad To Worse (& Dub) (19

Posted in Burning Spear, Dub with tags , on July 29, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

ass
“… Even myself knows that too, why can’t you
give us all rights and justice, equality and love
it’s maybe one or two, feeling the same way
all i can see and hear the people sayin’ it is
getting from bad to worst …”
musixmatch
YouTube: Bad To Worse (& Dub)

Rude Reggae: Rough Riders

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Laurel Aitken, Max Romeo, Nora Dean, Prince Buster, Ska with tags , , , , , on July 27, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

roughrider
“We are back with another Reggae article! ‘Rude Reggae – Rough Riders’ has been taken from a Black Music Magazine from 1974. It was, in fact, part of a special called Sexy Soul, Blue Blues and Rude Reggae. The author of the Reggae section was Carl Gayle, as usual, providing an entertaining and interesting read. … At its worst, rude reggae can plumb the depths of childish smut. At its best, it has an earthy and unselfconscious directness which can make the prudest of prudes explode with laughter. Rude reggae has always been around, but it wasn’t until about two years ago that most British record buyers got their first mild taste of it through the work of the jokey, amiable Judge Dread and his ‘Big Six’ (later followed by ‘Big Seven’ and ‘Big Eight’). ‘Big Six’ was banned by the BBC, which boosted its sales. But in truth Dread’s songs are pretty tame and it is significant that his most suggestive track, ‘Dr. Kitch’, is not his own song but simply a version of the original calypso by Lord Kitchener, issued in Britain a decade ago on the fielding Island label – Jump Up- (and covered by Georgie Fame). …”
bigsix
“… One of Buster’s first rude records was ‘Rough Rider’, released in 1968. The subject of the song is a duel between the consenting couple in which the singer is clearly in some discomfort after losing the first round: ‘She was a rough rider, cool stroker, strong winner. . . / I had a hard night, last night”. A year later Buster was revealing frustration in ‘Wreck a Pum Pum’ with similar aggression: ‘I want a girl to wreck her pum pum / and if she ugly I don’t mind / I have a . . . and I want a grind.’ If there’s one singer who’s had as much influence as Buster on later Jamaican rude records it has to be the inimitable Laurel Aitken, who seems to be at his best when he’s being vulgar. ‘Fire In Your Wire’ was a ‘shocker’ when it appeared in 1968 as much for Aitken’s gruff, exaggerated vocal style as for the potently suggestive music and lyrics. …”
fattyfatty
“… The first set of rude records came from the ‘ska’ era. Justin Hines and The Dominoes made the most notable contribution in this field, Hines’ extravagantly ethnic vocal style lent itself well to the group’s two best known suggestive songs, ‘Penny Reel’ and ‘Rub Up Push Up’. In the latter, he suggests an ideal ways of making it up after a quarrel: ‘You rub up, you push up, you love up because you know you were wrong’. The Heptones’ biggest selling record ‘Fatty Fatty’ (1967) was their first ever record and was their only flirtation with the rude medium. It’s a cool atmospheric rocksteady song exposing the singer’s frustration as he begins to look forward to what he’d like to be doing tonight. …”
The Ballroom Blitz
bangbanglulu
YouTube: Judge Dread – Big Six, Lord Kitchener – Dr. Kitch aka The Needle (1963), Prince Buster & All Stars – Rough Rider, Prince Buster – Wreck A Pum Pum, Laurel Aitken – Pussy Price, Justin Hines And The Dominoes – Rub Up Push Up, The Heptones – Fattie Fattie, Derrick Morgan – Kill Me Dead, Lloyd Terrel – Bang Bang Lulu, Max Romeo – Wet Dream, Nora Dean – Barbwire, Wailing Wailers – Bend Down Low

Dennis Brown ‎– Bubbling Fountain (Love Jah) (1980)

Posted in Dennis Brown, Dub, King Tubby, The Revolutionaries with tags , , , on July 22, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

M162333W595
“BIG BIG Heavy roots steppers cut from Dennis Brown, first time issue on a 12″ only found on his ‘Spellbound’ album from 1980. Big plays from Shaka check the b-side for unreleased dubs. Comes with company sleeve and pressed very loud for maximum pleasure….”
Sounds of the Universe
Discogs
YouTube: Bubbling Fountain (Love Jah)

Lacksley Castell – Morning Glory (1982)

Posted in Channel One, Lacksley Castell with tags , on July 19, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

LacksleyCastell_MorningGlory
“Classic 1982 set from the late lamented youth singer Lacksley Castell produced by Robert Palmer for Negus Roots, recorded at Tuff Gong and Channel One with members of The Revolutionaries and We The People and recently digitally mixed and mastered at Mafia & Fluxy by Gussie P. Features the classic roots anthem Mr. Government Man.”
Dub Vendor
Discogs
YouTube: Morning Glory | 12″ Negus Roots 1982 (Full Album)

Jamaiel Shabaka – I Am That I Am (1986)

Posted in Channel One, Dub, Jamaiel Shabaka, Sugar Minott with tags , , , on July 14, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

ee
“It was a record. It’s always a record. A few months ago, while on a visit to the best unsung record shop in Los Angeles, Mono Records, owner John pulled an intriguing LP off his oh-so-coveted shelf of not-yet-priced acquisitions. He wanted to show me a reggae record he didn’t know anything about, lost—but not so lost, as I would soon discover—in a huge collection of radical jazz he had just purchased. Credited to one Jamaiel Shabaka, it sounded both heavy and definitely different. Its intricate artwork read Land of the Rising Sun, and its back-sleeve notes only added to the mystery: Recorded and mixed at studios such as Hit City West (L.A.), Channel One and Music Mountain (Jamaica), engineered by four different people including legendary singer/producer Sugar Minott. …”
Jamaiel Shabaka cut his teeth with legend Sun Ra before recording the mysterious reggae LP The Land of the Rising Sun
YouTube: Jamaiel Shabaka – I Am That I Am 12″

Junior Brown – What A Disaster (2015)

Posted in Dub, Pressure Sounds, Robbie Shakespeare, Sly Dunbar with tags , , , on July 14, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

what-a-disaster-junior-brown
“Three cuts of Junior Brown/ Phil Pratts ‘What a disaster’. The rhythm was recorded in Jamaica by Sly and Robbie and was part of the Dial M for Murder lp. The Junior Brown vocal was voiced in the UK and released on The Mystic label. We have an extra mix added to the Pressure Sounds release by The Disciple. A killer release that comes in a hand stamped bag made out of re-cycled card.”
Pressure Sounds
YouTube: What A Disaster