Archive for the Bob Marley and the Wailers Category

Equal Rights – Peter Tosh (1977)

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Peter Tosh with tags , on June 18, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


Equal Rights was to be the album that propelled Peter Tosh to the top of the reggae world — the rival to onetime fellow Wailer Bob Marley. Time has shown that this lofty aspiration was not borne out, but Equal Rights remains among the handful of best, and most influential, reggae albums ever recorded. Tosh was always the most militant of the original Wailers and this album reflects that outlook. Whether it is preaching about the unity of the African diaspora (‘African’), protesting conditions in South Africa (‘Apartheid’), or giving a more general call to arms (‘Get Up, Stand Up’), Equal Rights is a political album. This is at times crippling, as some tracks are more effective as political statements than they are as songs. This, in fact, is a primary difference between Tosh and MarleyMarley‘s political statements never overwhelmed his songs. Unfortunately, this is not always the case with Tosh. That being said, ‘Downpresser Man’ (based on a folk standard), ‘Stepping Razor,’ and his definitive version of ‘Get Up, Stand Up’ are as good a trio of songs as you will find on any album, reggae or not. Tosh‘s singing is angry and forceful and the music is intricate and distinctive. On these three tracks you can see why people thought that Tosh could become a transcendent international star. The rest of the album, however, shows why he never quite lived up to that potential.”
allmusic
W – Equal Rights
YouTube: Equal Rights 1:10:15

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“Simmer Down” – The Skatalites (1963)

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Coxsone Dodd, Peter Tosh, Ska, Studio One with tags , , , , on December 27, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“‘Simmer Down’ was the first single released by The Wailers, accompanied by the ska supergroup, The Skatalites, and produced by Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd in 1963. It was the number one hit in Jamaica in February, 1964. The song was directed to the ‘Rude Boys’ of the ghettos of Jamaica at the time, sending them a message to cool down or ‘Simmer Down’ with all the violence and crime going on in Kingston. The subject matter of ‘Simmer Down’ made The Wailers stand out amongst their contemporaries. The Wailers at this time contained Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Junior Braithwaite, Cherry Smith, and Beverley Kelso. It was Bob Marley’s first hit and his career as a songwriter and performer took off from there. Although ‘Simmer Down’ was a hit, Peter Tosh, one of the three original Wailers, has said in an interview that he hated it.”
Wikipedia

“The Skatalites are a ska band from Jamaica. They played initially between 1963 and 1965, and recorded many of their best known songs in the period, including ‘Guns of Navarone.’ They also played on records by Prince Buster and backed many other Jamaican artists who recorded during that period.[1] They reformed in 1983 and have played together ever since.The founders of the Skatalites were Tommy McCook (died 1998), Rolando Alphonso (died 1998), Lloyd Brevett (died 2012), Lloyd Knibb (died 2011), Don Drummond (died 1969), Jah Jerry Haynes (died 2007), Jackie Mittoo (died 1990), Johnny Moore (died 2008) and Jackie Opel (died 1970). These ten musicians started to play together from 1955, when Kingston’s recording studios started to develop. Tommy McCook was the first member of the band to record, though not for commercial release: he played with Don Hitchman’s Group in 1953. In spring 1964, The Skatalites recorded their first LP Ska Authentic at Studio One in Kingston and toured Jamaica as the creators of ska. …”
The Skatalites – Simmer down

YouTube: Simmer down, I Don’t Need Your Love

Rude Reggae: Rough Riders

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Laurel Aitken, Max Romeo, Nora Dean, Prince Buster, Ska with tags , , , , , on July 27, 2016 by 1960s: Days of Rage

roughrider
“We are back with another Reggae article! ‘Rude Reggae – Rough Riders’ has been taken from a Black Music Magazine from 1974. It was, in fact, part of a special called Sexy Soul, Blue Blues and Rude Reggae. The author of the Reggae section was Carl Gayle, as usual, providing an entertaining and interesting read. … At its worst, rude reggae can plumb the depths of childish smut. At its best, it has an earthy and unselfconscious directness which can make the prudest of prudes explode with laughter. Rude reggae has always been around, but it wasn’t until about two years ago that most British record buyers got their first mild taste of it through the work of the jokey, amiable Judge Dread and his ‘Big Six’ (later followed by ‘Big Seven’ and ‘Big Eight’). ‘Big Six’ was banned by the BBC, which boosted its sales. But in truth Dread’s songs are pretty tame and it is significant that his most suggestive track, ‘Dr. Kitch’, is not his own song but simply a version of the original calypso by Lord Kitchener, issued in Britain a decade ago on the fielding Island label – Jump Up- (and covered by Georgie Fame). …”
bigsix
“… One of Buster’s first rude records was ‘Rough Rider’, released in 1968. The subject of the song is a duel between the consenting couple in which the singer is clearly in some discomfort after losing the first round: ‘She was a rough rider, cool stroker, strong winner. . . / I had a hard night, last night”. A year later Buster was revealing frustration in ‘Wreck a Pum Pum’ with similar aggression: ‘I want a girl to wreck her pum pum / and if she ugly I don’t mind / I have a . . . and I want a grind.’ If there’s one singer who’s had as much influence as Buster on later Jamaican rude records it has to be the inimitable Laurel Aitken, who seems to be at his best when he’s being vulgar. ‘Fire In Your Wire’ was a ‘shocker’ when it appeared in 1968 as much for Aitken’s gruff, exaggerated vocal style as for the potently suggestive music and lyrics. …”
fattyfatty
“… The first set of rude records came from the ‘ska’ era. Justin Hines and The Dominoes made the most notable contribution in this field, Hines’ extravagantly ethnic vocal style lent itself well to the group’s two best known suggestive songs, ‘Penny Reel’ and ‘Rub Up Push Up’. In the latter, he suggests an ideal ways of making it up after a quarrel: ‘You rub up, you push up, you love up because you know you were wrong’. The Heptones’ biggest selling record ‘Fatty Fatty’ (1967) was their first ever record and was their only flirtation with the rude medium. It’s a cool atmospheric rocksteady song exposing the singer’s frustration as he begins to look forward to what he’d like to be doing tonight. …”
The Ballroom Blitz
bangbanglulu
YouTube: Judge Dread – Big Six, Lord Kitchener – Dr. Kitch aka The Needle (1963), Prince Buster & All Stars – Rough Rider, Prince Buster – Wreck A Pum Pum, Laurel Aitken – Pussy Price, Justin Hines And The Dominoes – Rub Up Push Up, The Heptones – Fattie Fattie, Derrick Morgan – Kill Me Dead, Lloyd Terrel – Bang Bang Lulu, Max Romeo – Wet Dream, Nora Dean – Barbwire, Wailing Wailers – Bend Down Low

The Wailing Wailers – Simmer Down (1965)

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers, Coxsone Dodd, Ska with tags , , on September 2, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

the-wailin-wailers-simmer-down-ska-beat
“‘Simmer Down’ was the first single released by The Wailers, accompanied by the ska supergroup, The Skatalites, and produced by Clement ‘Coxsone’ Dodd in 1963. It was the number one hit in Jamaica in February, 1964. The song was directed to the “Rude Boys” of the ghettos of Jamaica at the time, sending them a message to cool down or ‘Simmer Down’ with all the violence and crime going on in Kingston. The subject matter of ‘Simmer Down’ made The Wailers stand out amongst their contemporaries. The Wailers at this time contained Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Junior Braithwaite, Cherry Smith and Beverley Kelso. It was Bob Marley’s first hit and his career as a song writer and performer took off from there.”
Wikipedia

YouTube: Simmer Down

Survival – Bob Marley & The Wailers (1979)

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers with tags on August 7, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

Bob+Marley+-+Survival+-+LP+RECORD-299875
Survival is a roots reggae album by Bob Marley & The Wailers released in 1979. Survival is an album with an outwardly militant theme. Some speculate that this was due in part to criticism Marley received for the laid-back, ganja-soaked atmosphere of his previous release, ‘Kaya’, which seemed to sidetrack the urgency of his message. In the song ‘Africa Unite’, Marley proclaims Pan-African solidarity. The song ‘Zimbabwe’ is a hymn dedicated to later-independent Rhodesia. The song was performed at Zimbabwe’s Independence Celebration in 1980, just after the official declaration of Zimbabwe’s independence. Survival was originally to be called Black Survival to underscore the urgency of African unity, but the name was shortened to prevent misinterpretations of the album’s theme. Marley originally planned to release Survival as the first part of a trilogy, followed by Uprising in 1980 and Confrontation in 1983. In South Africa the album was partly censored by the then white apartheid government.”
Wikipedia

“Containing what is considered Marley’s most defiant and politically charged statement to date, Survival concerns itself with the expressed solidarity of not only Africa, but of humanity at large. The album was controversial right down to the jacket, which contains a crude schematic of the stowage compartment of a typical transatlantic slave ship. Survival is intended as a wake-up call for everyman to resist and fight oppression in all of its insidious forms. From Tyrone Downie’s opening synthesizer strains on ‘So Much Trouble in the World’ to the keyboard accents emerging throughout ‘Zimbabwe,’ the sounds of Survival are notably modern. The overwhelming influence of contemporary African music is also cited with the incorporation of brass, á la Fela Kuti and his horn-driven Africa ’70. …”
allmusic

YouTube: Survival
01. So Much Trouble in the World 02. Zimbabwe 4:00 03. Top Rankin’ 7:51 04. Babylon System 11:02 05. Survival 15:24 06. Africa Unite 19:16 07. One Drop 22:12 08. Ride Natty Ride 26:03 09. Ambush in The Night 29:55 10. Wake Up And Live (Bob Marley/Anthony Davis) 33:09

Bob Marley and The Wailers 21-07-1979 – Completo

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers with tags on June 11, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“On July 21, 1979 Bob Marley and The Wailers, Dick Gregory, Olatunji, Eddie Palmieri, Jabula, the art of Black Dance and Patti Labelle came to Harvard Stadium in Boston for a concert to benefit the on-going struggles in Zimbabwe, Namibia and South Africa. The concert was called AMANDLA.: Festival of Unity. A benfit Concert for Relief and Humanitarian Aid to Southern Africa. 25 years later in making this video of the performance of Bob Marley and the Wailers, we celebrate the triumph of these liberation struggles of the people of Southern Africa for equality, dignity and self determination.”
YouTube: Completo 1:46:27
Announcer Intro. for Dick Gregory.  Positive Vibration – Slave Driver – Them Belly Full – Runnin Away – Crazy Baldhead – The Heathen – War – No More Trouble – Lively Up Yourself – No Woman No Cry – Jammin – Get Up Stand Up – Exodus – Zimbabwe – Wake Up

Bob Marley & the Wailers – Natural Mystic: The Legend Lives On (1995)

Posted in Bob Marley and the Wailers with tags on April 8, 2014 by 1960s: Days of Rage

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“Despite its massive commercial success, Legend, the 1984 Bob Marley & the Wailers compilation, was not an impressive ‘best-of’ of the group’s full career. It was assembled to highlight Marley’s U.K. hit singles of the late ’70s and seriously underrepresented his early standards. You might think, therefore, that 11 years later, when Island Records finally got around to releasing what is, in essence, ‘Legend, Vol. 2,’ the label would redress the imbalance. No such luck. As its title, Natural Mystic: The Legend Lives On, suggests, this Marley ‘rest-of’ has the same flaw as its predecessor. (‘Natural Mystic,’ the leadoff track, is from 1977’s Exodus, an album that had already provided five tracks to Legend.) Although there were few additional U.K. singles, this collection gathers them up, including ‘Iron Lion Zion’ and the newly reconfigured “Keep on Moving,” both posthumous tracks heavily overdubbed long after Marley’s death that sound little like his classic style. The rest of the album scatters tracks from such later albums as Survival and Uprising, though there are three songs from Rastaman Vibration, an album ignored by Legend, one of them Marley’s sole Billboard Hot 100 chart entry, ‘Roots, Rock, Reggae.’ … Maybe due to recording or publishing contracts, Island has some reason to avoid putting Bob Marley & the Wailers’ early classics on their compilations. In any case, Natural Mystic: The Legend Lives On adds to the frustration of fans who expect compilations to actually feature the highlights of the band’s career.”
allmusic

Natural Mystic: The Legend Lives On is a collection of album tracks by Bob Marley, and is an addendum to the 1984 compilation album, Legend. The material on Legend consists mainly of love songs with a few of Marley’s more politicized and religious themed works; the selection on Natural Mystic therefore attempts to redress the balance. On the opening title track, he warns of how ‘one and all got to face reality now’ in a world of massive upheaval and change. Other songs explore salvation through oneness (‘Africa Unite’), the greed that propels the world towards an inevitable Armageddon (‘So Much Trouble In The World’) and Marley’s own role as a persecuted leader (‘Iron Lion Zion’). The magic that was part of his and The Wailers’ live shows erupts in the included version of ‘Trenchtown Rock’ which has an infectiuousness that demands a rhythmic response. The inclusion of ‘Easy Skanking’ shows a meditative and laid-back Marley, partaking in Jamaica’s most profitable cash crop during a spiritual time-out amidst the chaos of everyday life.”
Wikipedia

YouTube: Natural Mystic (Live), Roots Rock Reggae, Trenchtown Rock

YouTube: Natural Mystic – The Legend Lives On (Full Album)