Archive for Prince Alla

Prince Alla – Bosrah (1976)

Posted in Black Ark, Lee "Scratch" Perry, Prince Alla with tags , , on August 9, 2017 by 1960s: Days of Rage


“Those familiar with the biblical story of King Melchizedek may mistakenly believe that Prince Alla is paying tribute to that most esteemed of regal priests. Their confusion is understandable, though, for roots artists often give a Rastafarian twist to a Biblical verse, in Alla‘s case, Hebrews 7:3. The Old Testament held up Melchizedek as the quintessential priest and the most righteous of religious men, but listeners learn more of him from the apostle Paul, who told the Hebrews that Melchizedek was also a ‘king of peace, without father, without mother, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life…abideth a priest continually.’ Although Alla paraphrases this verse, he’s not referring to the King of Salem at all; in fact, he’s actually paying tribute to Prince Edward Emmanuel. This Rastafarian elder was leader of the Bobo sect to which Alla belongs, and had often drawn parallels between himself and Melchizedek. Tapper Zukie was thoroughly impressed with the Prince‘s homage. Just out of his teens, the young DJ was eager to cross into production, and ‘Bosrah’ was to become one of his first recordings. The toaster and singer set to work at the Black Ark studio, with Lee Perry stepping in to help with the arrangement. Alla‘s preaching is suitably bold, while behind him Roy ‘Soft’ Palmer and Melodian Tony Brevett add their own strong, close harmonies. The fabulous riddim is a fiery version of Burning Spear‘s ‘Joe Frazier,’ which Zukie would remix for his own In Dub album. the Prince‘s single, credited to Ras Allah & the Prophets, was originally released in Jamaica by Vivian ‘Yabby You’ Jackson, and then by Zukie‘s own Stars label, before being picked up for U.K. consumption by K&B Records. – Jo-Ann Greene”
allmusic
amazon: Dub: Soundscapes and Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae
YouTube: Bosrah

Prince Alla – Only Love Can Conquer (1976-1979)

Posted in Prince Alla, Rastafarians, Riddims with tags , , , , , on December 9, 2013 by 1960s: Days of Rage

B+F-Prince-Allah-sfw
“This collection of singles by the relatively obscure roots-reggae singer Prince Alla (backed by the Soul Syndicate, the preeminent reggae studio band of the seventies) is a revelation. Imagine someone with the tone of a young Johnnie Clarke and the expressiveness of Sugar Minott at his best, and then take away the lover’s rock and you’ve got Prince Alla: an angel’s voice with an apocalyptic edge. If you want a good distillation of the Rastafarian message, look no further. It’s all here, from the condemnation of materialism (‘They Never Love,’ complete with a dub version) to the unapologetic sexism (‘Lot’s Wife,’ ‘Lady Deceiver’) and the political rabble-rousing (‘Youthman in the Ghetto’). Through it all, the Soul Syndicate burns with a thick, slow one-drop groove that never lets up the pressure. If you don’t own this disc, repent now.”
allmusic

“A superb set showcasing the vocal talents of Prince Alla, the archetypal roots singer and ghetto sufferer. Voiced and mixed at King Tubby’s studio by Scientist (who also contributes a couple of extended dub mixes) and Tubby himself. This compilation includes the original vocal cuts of ‘Stone’, ‘Lot’s Wife’ and ‘Bucket Bottom’ which appeared in their dub versions on Freedom Sounds In Dub.”
Blood and Fire

YouTube: Lot’s Wife, Only Love Can Conquer, They Never Love, Lady Deceiver + Version, Youthman in the Ghetto (discomix), Stone, Black Rose (Stone Riddim), Bucket Bottom