Cornell Campbell – I Shall Not Remove: 1975-1980

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“Most Blood & Fire releases should be considered essential purchases for any fan of golden-era reggae, but this one is even better than most. Cornel Campbell is one of the best reggae singers ever recorded — a sweet-toned falsettist with effortless intonation and a cool, assured delivery that is incredibly easy on the ear. The centerpiece of this collection is the three-part ‘Gorgon’ series of singles produced by the legendary Bunny ‘Striker’ Lee, all featuring the ‘flying cymbals’ style of drumming popular at the time. ‘The Gorgon’ having been a huge hit, it was followed quickly by ‘The Gorgon Speaks’ and ‘The Conquering Gorgon,’ all three of which are presented here (the first two in extended versions, the second in its original version and then again in a Rastafarian variation titled ‘Lion of Judah’). Almost equally important, though, are ‘Natty Dread in a Greenwich Town’ (an answer record to Bob Marley’s ‘Natty Dread’) and ‘Dance in a Greenwich Town,’ the latter in a megamix format that incorporates a deejay version by Dr. Alimantado and a dub version mixed by King Tubby. But really, just about every track reaches the same standard — there is not a single weak cut or boring moment on this spectacular album.”
allmusic

“In a scene blessed with great voices, Cornell Campbell’s distinctive tenor / falsetto is one of the best-loved. Having made classics like ‘Stars’ and ‘Queen Of The Minstrels’ for Coxsone, Cornell went on to become even more successful with hitmaker Bunny Lee in the 1970s. Included in this compilation are hits like ‘Natty Dread In A Greenwich Town’, ‘Bandulu’ and the complete ‘Gorgon’ song series. Deejays Dr Alimantado and the late Ranking Dread also make guest appearances. This collection covers the period when Cornell Campbell was recording under the great Bunny Lee, pioneer of the percussion-driven flying-cymbal sound. Lee Scratch Perry and Augustus Pablo may have been making names for themselves overseas, but this is the sound that was lighting up Kingston dancehalls in the mid-Seventies. Balmy old rhythms reappropriated, revamped and revitalised in true Jamaican style; hi-hats hissing like snakes in Eden; and Campbell’s achingly tender, almost hymnal, voice.”
Blood and Fire

YouTube: I Shall Not Remove, Two Face Rasta, The Gorgon Speaks, Dance In A Greenwich Farm

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