Burning Spear – Marcus Garvey/Garvey’s Ghost (1990)

c82a6816c
“This disc brings together Marcus Garvey, Burning Spear’s debut album, with its dub counterpart, entitled Garvey’s Ghost. The resulting package is one of the pillars of roots reggae, an album packed with thick, heavy grooves and uncompromising religious and political messages. Although this Mango reissue has been criticized as sonically weaker than the Jamaican original, it will sound plenty dread to all but the most critical ears. Songs like the title track, ‘Slavery Days’ and ‘Give Me’ (with its remarkably well-integrated flute part) all tremble with the intensity of Winston Rodney’s dark voice, and some of the dub versions (in particular ‘Black Wa-Da-Da,’ based on ‘The Invasion’) number among the most frightening ever created. There are no sing-along melodies here; Burning Spear has always been more about setting up a relentless groove and using it to get the words across. But that groove is glorious, and it’s more than sufficient to support the significant weight of the lyrics.”
allmusic

Marcus Garvey is the third album by the reggae singer Burning Spear, released in 1975 on Island Records, ILPS 9377. The album is named after the Jamaican National Hero and Rastafari movement prophet Marcus Garvey. A dub version of it was released four months later as Garvey’s Ghost. This was the first album by the group recorded for Island Records, whose founder Chris Blackwell had been instrumental in breaking Jamaican reggae artists Jimmy Cliff, Toots and the Maytals, and Bob Marley to an international audience. It was produced by Lawrence Lindo, better known by his handle taken from the assassin of Lee Harvey Oswald, Jack Ruby. Apparently, upon their first meeting, Lindo and vocalist Winston Rodney realized the opening track to this album, ‘Marcus Garvey.’ The backing musicians, whom Lindo named The Black Disciples band, had been assembled from The Soul Syndicate and The Wailers.”
W – Marcus Garvey

Garvey’s Ghost is the fourth album by the reggae group Burning Spear, which was one of the seminal vocal trios in reggae. released in 1976 on Island Records, ILPS 9382. Each track is a dub version of its correspondent song on the group’s third album, Marcus Garvey. This album was fashioned by Island Record engineers John Burns and Dick Cuthell in their Hammersmith studio. It features prominently the backing musicians, whom Lindo named The Black Disciples band, assembled from members of the session group The Soul Syndicate and Bob Marley’s touring band, The Wailers. John Corbett has suggested that ‘dub’ could derive from ‘duppie,’ a Jamaican patois word for ghost, as Lee Perry has been quoted stating that dub is ‘the ghost in me coming out,’ this connection further illustrated by Winston Rodney having named this album as the ghost of Garvey.”
W – Garvey’s Ghost

YouTube: Marcus garvey, Slavery days, AFRICAN POSTMAN, Marcus Garvey & Garvey’s Ghost

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: